Like a normal featureless cube, but sings comical songs.
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Phone

5 Comments and 17 Shares
[*disables social networking accounts*] [*social isolation increases*] Wait, why does this ALSO feel bad?
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emdeesee
6 days ago
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Well, when you put it that way...
Lincoln, NE
reconbot
7 days ago
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New York City
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4 public comments
rraszews
7 days ago
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It's so sad that we can choose our friends from the entire world based on commonalities of interests and values, rather than the old fashioned way of choosing them based on accident of geography.
MaryEllenCG
6 days ago
But sometimes it's good, because what if you live in a super-rural area, and there aren't really any people who share your interests?
MaryEllenCG
6 days ago
Or, on review, you were being ironic, and I misread. Oops!
Covarr
7 days ago
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You may lose the sea of toxicity, but you also lose cat videos. Is that really a trade-off you want to make?
Moses Lake, WA
olliejones
7 days ago
Did it. Never felt better. But, I have a silly meatspace cat in my house.
Lythimus
7 days ago
@olliejones, jokes on you, you're participating in a social network.
courtwatson
7 days ago
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Yup. 2017...
alt_text_bot
7 days ago
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[*disables social networking accounts*] [*social isolation increases*] Wait, why does this ALSO feel bad?

Tying Up Loose Ends

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Ads by Project Wonderful! Your ad could be here, right now.

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emdeesee
19 days ago
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Whatever venture Punchbot is starting up, I want a piece.
Lincoln, NE
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Support

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emdeesee
22 days ago
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Failing to try or trying to fail?
Lincoln, NE
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Team Chat

8 Comments and 28 Shares
2078: He announces that he's finally making the jump from screen+irssi to tmux+weechat.
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emdeesee
54 days ago
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OK, fine. When the galactic singularity becomes an option, I'll consider switching from IRC.
Lincoln, NE
beowuff
54 days ago
Don't worry. It'll still run irc as it's back end, so you can still connect.
popular
54 days ago
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6 public comments
stsquad
50 days ago
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Truth
Cambridge, UK
hooges
53 days ago
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IRC, never die!
Topeka, KS
encolpe
54 days ago
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Si true
Lyon, France
Fidtz
54 days ago
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2051, solid 1960's style future prediction there!
Covarr
54 days ago
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What if I'm only still on IRC because the rest of my groups are?
Moses Lake, WA
alt_text_bot
54 days ago
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2078: He announces that he's finally making the jump from screen+irssi to tmux+weechat.

Writing Video Games in a Functional Style

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When I started this blog in 2007, a running theme was "Can interactive experiences like video games be written in a functional style?" These are programs heavily based around mutable state. They evolve, often drastically, during development, so there isn't a perfect up-front design to architect around. These were issues curiously avoided by the functional programming proponents of the 1980s and 1990s.

It's still not given much attention in 2016 in either. I regularly see excited tutorials about mapping and folding and closures and immutable variables, and even JavaScript has these things now, but there's a next step that's rarely discussed and much more difficult: how to keep the benefits of immutability in large and messy programs that could gain the most from functional solutions--like video games.

Before getting to that, here are the more skeptical functional programming articles I wrote, so it doesn't look like I'm a raving advocate:

I took a straightforward, arguably naive, approach to interactive functional programs: no monads (because I didn't understand them), no functional-reactive programming (ditto, plus all implementations had severe performance problems), and instead worked with the basic toolkit of function calls and immutable data structures. It's completely possible to write a video game (mostly) in that style, but it's not a commonly taught methodology. "Purely Functional Retrogames" has most of the key lessons, but I added some additional techniques later:

The bulk of my experience came from rewriting a 60fps 2D shooter in mostly-pure Erlang. I wrote about it in An Outrageous Port, but there's not much detail. It really needed to be a multi-part series with actual code.

For completeness, here are the other articles that directly discuss FP:

If I find any I missed, I'll add them.

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emdeesee
57 days ago
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Some stuff to think about/read through/mull over regarding implementing games in a functional style.
Lincoln, NE
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Gravity-Defying Stacked Coin Sculptures by Shunsuke Tani

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With a little bit of creativity and, occasionally, a whole lot of patience, any household item can be turned into material for art. And it’s often the most mundane of items that have the greatest impact. For Shunsuke Tani, a young biologist major-turned childcare specialist, it was spare change that was lying around his house that became one of his greatest passions.

“My final coin stacking of 2016” said Tani

Specifically, Tani primarily uses 1 and 5 yen coins, the lowest of denominations, and the occasional 500 yen or foreign currency coin, to create stunning, gravity-defying sculptures that, at any moment, look like the could come tumbling down. And indeed they do. To prove to skeptics who, understandably, claim he uses glue or some advanced form of computer graphics to render his creations, Tani occasionally shares videos of his sculptures falling down. It’s a painful moment that stands in stark contrasts with the hours of time and patience required for assembly.

Tani posts his creations to a twitter account where he often shares how much time each sculpture took to create (usually 2 – 3 hours). He also adds some self-deprecating humor like “I have no other skills in life, other than this” or “I sacrificed 2 hours of my life.”

According to an interview, Tani originally began stacking coins about 4 years ago. The inspiration came from the simple act of stacking a 10 and 1 yen coin had with him at the time. Tani’s art is a testament to the fact that even the most simple and ordinary can be honed to perfection.

630 yen worth of 1 yen coins

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emdeesee
57 days ago
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Lincoln, NE
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