Like a normal featureless cube, but sings comical songs.
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SarosInfinity wrote:
By assuming the possibility of another layer of paper, it means you sort of know that there’s gotta be something hidden you’re not sensing; though that certain something might be beyond your reach. UNLESS, you think like a witch-hunter. Left, right, up, down? Pshhh, 2 dimensional. Try going inwards or outwards instead.

Yeah, that’s… that’s just called moving in three dimensions. It’s not exactly a witchhunter-tier accomplishment. You’ve actually been doing it a lot out here, you just don’t have a second mind’s eye for depth perception.

The entire point of the “separate sheet of paper” analogy was that each “sheet” represented a whole three-dimensional universe. If you’re right, it doesn’t matter how far inward, outward, up, down, left or right you reach your little magicka line – you’d never reach across into the “next sheet” because it’s not in any of those directions. Rather than literally being on top of eachother like a stack of paper, the planes people summon help from would be lined up in some fourth dimension. And unlike a needle poking through papers, you can’t imagine what something reaching perpendicularly through multiple universes would even look like.

Felaeris wrote:
You said they’re supposed to be holes in the Aetherius, right? IF we’re traveling on a flat sheet (in two dimensions) and falling through a ‘hole’ carries us to a third, a dimension perpendicular to the sheet, wouldn’t ‘falling’ through a ‘ball’ or ‘3rd dimensional hole’ send us falling through a fourth dimension. A plane orthogonal to the 3 dimensions we know?

HaphazardAdventurer wrote:
Imagine a world that exists on a flat piece of paper with a population of little 2 dimensional beings that can only perceve and traverse the flat plane of the paper. Now if you, as a 3 dimensional being, were to poke a hole through that paper, these beings would find an area of their world that, as far as their understanding of the fabric of reality allows, simply doesn’t exist.

Unless…

You think back to that thing you were always told, about the stars being “holes to Aetherius”. If the night sky were a giant black ceiling like you thought when you were little, then a hole poked through it would just be a circle. But… if someone cut a round hole in three dimensional space, it wouldn’t be a circle – it would be a sphere. A sphere-shaped hole leading directly in the fourth dimension!

Of course, when you tried to slam your little magicka-line into the stars, it just bounced off the edges. This could mean the “holes to Aetherius” story is bullshit and you’re overthinking a children’s fairytale, or it could just mean that the hole is closed off on its edges. Given that you can move your magicka-line freely around the outside of the star, that really makes it less of a “hole” and more of a “tube”. And if the star is just a cross-section of a weird tube leading across multiple planes, maybe you could…

JJR wrote:
Remember that book you panic flipped through? One of the pages was about creating a so called Standard Magickal Star Tesseract.

Cheese wrote:
Orient to the warrior head star, form the tesseract. Conjuration code: 8068480098

Fuck, that’s right, the book! Just before you went blind, you were looking at a magic book that mentioned otherworldly denizens, and there was a whole section in it talking about stars! You frantically try to recall details of what you saw. If your ridiculous and over-complicated idea about stars being tubes reaching through multiple planes of existence is right, you might be able to follow those tubes. If you knew roughly where the next step along a four-dimensional tube was going to be, following it might be as simple as, like, searching the correct spot in three-dimensional space. You remember the book had an almost map-like diagram of some constellations with six stars labeled, and if you could remember what…

The thought dwindles out as you feel a sudden silence in the air. Sigrid has stopped talking. Your brief reprieve to look for a magical solution is almost over. Moving fast, you drive your magicka-line toward the nearest thing that looks sort of like a constellation from the book.
You have no idea how reaching to another plane works, what this sort of magic is supposed to look like, or if you’re even on the right track with your dumb idea about planes and tubes. To make matters worse, you probably have seconds left before your silence seems weird and Sigrid knows something is up. Taking a deep breath, you close your already blind eyes, you try to concentrate on all six stars at once, and you reach.

Additional resource credits: Caliber, AMKitsune

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emdeesee
2 days ago
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i enjoy this story but it's not great in feed form tbqh
📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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Magical Bookends Transform Bookshelves into the Back Alleys of Japan

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back alley bookends. photo by monde

If you’ve ever wandered around Tokyo on foot you’ll know that it can sometimes be like a spider web of side streets and back alleys. It’s one of the things that makes Tokyo so unique and therein lies the allure of exploring the massive city. Now, one designer has brought that magic to bookshelves by designing back alley bookends.

the back alley bookends, on display at Design Festa in Tokyo. Photo by twitter user @riku_ton

The clever idea is the brainchild of a Japanese designer who goes by the name monde. Based in Tokyo, monde creates objects inspired by the city but also animals and insects. The back alley bookends come in a pair and can be used together to replicate a small back alley, or they can be used individually, exposing the intricate stepping stones, A/C units, piping, plants and other details that have been carefully recreated by hand.

Monde exhibited the back alley bookends, along with other works, last weekend at Design Festa, a Tokyo-based arts & crafts event where artists, both amateur and professional, come together to exhibit their artwork. The event has since ended but the next dates (August 2-4 and then November 10-11, 2018) have already been announced. If you’re interested, you can also try reaching out to the artist directly.

a detailed shot of the back alley bookends. photo by twitter user @riku_ton

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emdeesee
7 days ago
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Wow...
📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Smaug

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
Also, suddenly the per-pound value of dragon meat has cratered.

New comic!
Today's News:
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emdeesee
7 days ago
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I'm not sure how many are intended, but I sure see a lot of layers here.
📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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1 public comment
francisga
13 days ago
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I'm not sure I understand this one.
Lafayette, LA, USA
Cognoscan
13 days ago
I think the he convinces Smaug to fly to the town to start investing, whereupon he is attacked and then killed before he can say anything.
Lythimus
13 days ago
I concur, too much of a leap. I don't get why the town is flaming, but I think the joke is that this was not the expected ending. Maybe hoarding gold in a cave IS the best means of survival.

advertisingpics:“When you’re first in Color TV, there’s got to...

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advertisingpics:

“When you’re first in Color TV, there’s got to be a reason.” (1967)

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emdeesee
14 days ago
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"Color television is a dad." - my dad
📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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Terry Gilliam Reveals the Secrets of Monty Python Animations: A 1974 How-To Guide

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Before he directed such mind-bending masterpieces as Time Bandits, Brazil and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, before he became short-hand for a filmmaker cursed with cosmically bad luck, before he became the sole American member of seminal British comedy group Monty Python, Terry Gilliam made a name for himself creating odd animated bits for the UK series Do Not Adjust Your Set. Gilliam preferred cut-out animation, which involved pushing bits of paper in front of a camera instead of photographing pre-drawn cels. The process allows for more spontaneity than traditional animation along with being comparatively cheaper and easier to do.

Gilliam also preferred to use old photographs and illustrations to create sketches that were surreal and hilarious. Think Max Ernst meets Mad Magazine. For Monty Python’s Flying Circus, he created some of the most memorable moments of a show chock full of memorable moments: A pram that devours old ladies, a massive cat that menaces London, and a mustached police officer who pulls open his shirt to reveal the chest of a shapely woman. He also created the show’s most iconic image, that giant foot during the title sequence.




On Bob Godfrey’s series Do It Yourself Film Animation Show, Gilliam delved into the nuts and bolts of his technique. You can watch it above. Along the way, he sums up his thoughts on the medium:

The whole point of animation to me is to tell a story, make a joke, express an idea. The technique itself doesn’t really matter. Whatever works is the thing to use. That’s why I use cut-out. It’s the easiest form of animation I know.

He also notes that the key to cut-out animation is to know its limitations. Graceful, elegant movement à la Walt Disney is damned near impossible. Swift, sudden movements, on the other hand, are much simpler. That’s why there are far more beheadings in his segments than ballroom dancing. Watch the whole clip. If you are a hardcore Python enthusiast, as I am, it is pleasure to watch him work. Below find one of his first animated movies, Storytime, which includes, among other things, the tale of Don the Cockroach. Also don't miss, this video featuring All of Terry Gilliam’s Monty Python Animations in a Row.

Related Content: 

The Best Animated Films of All Time, According to Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam: The Difference Between Kubrick (Great Filmmaker) and Spielberg (Less So)

The Miracle of Flight, the Classic Early Animation by Terry Gilliam

Jonathan Crow is a Los Angeles-based writer and filmmaker whose work has appeared in Yahoo!, The Hollywood Reporter, and other publications. You can follow him at @jonccrow.


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emdeesee
14 days ago
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📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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Lisp, Jazz, Aikido – Three Expressions of a Single Essence

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Didier Verna

The Art, Science, and Engineering of Programming, 2018, Vol. 2, Issue 3, Article 10

Submission date: 2017-12-01
Publication date: 2018-03-29
DOI: https://doi.org/10.22152/programming-journal.org/2018/2/10
Full text: PDF

Abstract

The relation between Science (what we can explain) and Art (what we can’t) has long been acknowledged and while every science contains an artistic part, every art form also needs a bit of science. Among all scientific disciplines, programming holds a special place for two reasons. First, the artistic part is not only undeniable but also essential. Second, and much like in a purely artistic discipline, the act of programming is driven partly by the notion of aesthetics: the pleasure we have in creating beautiful things.

Even though the importance of aesthetics in the act of programming is now unquestioned, more could still be written on the subject. The field called “psychology of programming” focuses on the cognitive aspects of the activity, with the goal of improving the productivity of programmers. While many scientists have emphasized their concern for aesthetics and the impact it has on their activity, few computer scientists have actually written about their thought process while programming.

What makes us like or dislike such and such language or paradigm? Why do we shape our programs the way we do? By answering these questions from the angle of aesthetics, we may be able to shed some new light on the art of programming. Starting from the assumption that aesthetics is an inherently transversal dimension, it should be possible for every programmer to find the same aesthetic driving force in every creative activity they undertake, not just programming, and in doing so, get deeper insight on why and how they do things the way they do.

On the other hand, because our aesthetic sensitivities are so personal, all we can really do is relate our own experiences and share it with others, in the hope that it will inspire them to do the same. My personal life has been revolving around three major creative activities, of equal importance: programming in Lisp, playing Jazz music, and practicing Aikido. But why so many of them, why so different ones, and why these specifically?

By introspecting my personal aesthetic sensitivities, I eventually realized that my tastes in the scientific, artistic, and physical domains are all motivated by the same driving forces, hence unifying Lisp, Jazz, and Aikido as three expressions of a single essence, not so different after all. Lisp, Jazz, and Aikido are governed by a limited set of rules which remain simple and unobtrusive. Conforming to them is a pleasure. Because Lisp, Jazz, and Aikido are inherently introspective disciplines, they also invite you to transgress the rules in order to find your own. Breaking the rules is fun. Finally, if Lisp, Jazz, and Aikido unify so many paradigms, styles, or techniques, it is not by mere accumulation but because they live at the meta-level and let you reinvent them. Working at the meta-level is an enlightening experience.

Understand your aesthetic sensitivities and you may gain considerable insight on your own psychology of programming. Mine is perhaps common to most lispers. Perhaps also common to other programming communities, but that, is for the reader to decide…

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emdeesee
14 days ago
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How can not share a link that unifies three of my favorite things. [LONG]
📌 Lincoln, NE ❤️️ Sherman, TX
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